Wednesday, January 10, 2018

TEAM TUX UPDATE: Service Dog Alerts

Hey Cushies. I haven't shared much about my training with Tux, my service dog. I hope to do more in 2018.

I had to stop to tell you about what happened today.

I woke at 8 am but stayed in bed until 9:15. After I took Tux out to potty, he never left me alone. He wasn't just by my side. He was constantly trying to get my attention.

Smelling my breath.
Whining.
Barking.
Licking my face.
Sitting and staring.
Pawing me.
Climbing in my lap.
Biting my forearm.
Nibbling my chin.
Walking all over my lap.

Tux was getting my attention. What was he trying to tell me? I don't know.

I thanked him. Praised and petted him. I told him he is such a smart doggie and one day soon I'll learn what he is telling me. He'd be content with the loving for al of two minutes, then he would start it all up again.

Smelling my breath.
Whining.
Barking.
Licking my face.
Sitting and staring.
Pawing me.
Climbing in my lap.
Biting my forearm.
Nibbling my chin.
Walking all over the bruises from the past times. It hurts and sometimes I get mad. I'm trying to be more understanding, knowing he is telling me something. He is extremely well behaved as we have worked on his public access training over the past nine months.

Over and over, Tux was telling me something but I didn't know what.

Gratitude. Praise. Pet. Repeat.

Tux's aggressive alerts lasted from 10:50 am to 2:50 pm. I didn't feel that well. Back was hurting. A little nauseous and headache was ramping up.

I went to lie down for a few minutes at 2:50 pm. Out of the corner of my eye, I saw my orange medicine container on my side table.

The morning slot was full.
I forgot to take my morning meds.

😳🤭😱

Among my daily pain and psych meds, I also missed my fludrocortisone dose. Fludrocortisone replaces the adrenal hormone aldosterone.

Does it really matter, taking this medication just 10 hours late? Well, yeah!

Without adrenal glands, I don't make cortisol or aldosterone. This life-sustaining hormone helps regulate sodium and potassium levels in the body. It helps control blood pressure and the balance of fluids and electrolytes in the blood.

When Tux was alerting me, my blood pressure was low but pulse was high.

I'm so amazed by my dog. Thank goodness for Tux.
He takes care of me.

Be well, fellow Cushies.

PS My trainer Angela at Service Dogs Express told me Sunday that Tux is actually taking DNA samples when he nibbles on my chin. The term for that action is called "scraping." WOW, right?!

Monday, January 8, 2018

NADF’s Emergency Protocols

A big thanks to my friend Karen, founder of the EPIC Foundation for for sharing the National Adrenal Support Foundation. This resource has many links to documents to use in various medical settings, especially emergency protocols:   


http://www.nadf.us/tools-for-life/#emergency